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pre-school vision article
 

During the infant and toddler years, your child has been developing many vision skills and has been learning how to see. In the preschool years, this process continues as your child develops visually guided eye-hand-body coordination, fine motor skills, and the visual motor skills necessary to learn to read.

As a parent, you should watch for signs that may indicate a vision development problem, including a short attention span for the child’s age; difficulty with eye-hand-body coordination in ball play and bike riding; avoidance of coloring and puzzles and other detailed activities.

There are everyday things that you can do at home to help your preschooler’s vision develop as it should.

These activities include reading aloud to your child and letting him or her see what you are reading; providing a chalkboard, finger paints and different shaped blocks and showing your child how to use them in imaginative play; providing safe opportunities to use playground equipment such as a jungle gym and balance beam; and allowing time for interacting with other children and for playing independently.

By age three, your child should have a thorough optometric eye examination to make sure your preschooler’s vision is developing properly and there is no evidence of eye disease. If needed, your doctor can prescribe treatment including glasses and/or vision therapy to correct a vision development problem.

Here are several tips to make your child’s optometric examination a positive experience:

  1. Make an appointment early in the day. Allow about one hour.
  2. Talk about the examination in advance and encourage your child’s questions.
  3. Explain the examination in your child’s terms, comparing the E chart to a puzzle and the instruments to tiny flashlights and a kaleidoscope.

Unless recommended otherwise, your child’s next eye examination should be at age five. By comparing test results of the two examinations, your optometrist can tell how well your child’s vision is developing for the next major step. . .the school years.

Spring Hill Office

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1380 Pinehurst Dr.
Spring Hill, FL 34606
P: 352-683-2020  Fax: 352-683-3168

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 7pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 1pm
Sunday Closed

Port Richey Office

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8701 US 19
Port Richey, FL 34688
P: 727-842-2020  

Monday 2:30pm - 6:30pm
Tuesday 2pm - 7pm
Wednesday 9am - 1pm
Thursday 9am - 12pm
Friday 1pm - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 4pm
Sunday Closed

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Meet Dr. Weber

Dr. Weber received his Bachelor of Science Degree from the University of Florida, graduating with honors. He received his Doctorate from the Southern College of Optometry in Memphis Tennessee, graduating in the top two percent of his class. During his twenty five plus years in practice Dr. Weber has been committed to providing “state of the art” comprehensive eye care.

Dr. Weber has lived in the Tampa Bay area with his wife and daughter for over twenty five years. When not practicing the doctor enjoys golf, boating, cooking, and motorcycling cross country.

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